"For the Japanese, the crane—or tsuru—is considered a national treasure, appearing in art, literature, and folklore. The Japanese regard the crane as a symbol of good fortune and longevity because of its fabled life span of a thousand years. It also represents fidelity, as Japanese cranes are known to mate for life. Over time, the crane has also evolved as a favorite subject of the Japanese tradition of paper folding—origami—as children and adults attempt to master this art."

There is folklore about a young girl named Sadako Sasaki who was diagnosed with leukemia after being exposed to radiation from the bombing of Hiroshima during WWII. She wanted to fold 1,000 cranes before she died for eternal luck, health and happiness. She didn't reach her goal, but the symbol of hope stuck with the Japanese people.

Today at weddings and other celebrations, 1,000 cranes is thought to bring luck and hapiness to those the event is centered around.
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