Psych yourself into a confident state of mind

My confidence phrase is, “This speech is going to blow their minds. They don’t know what’s coming.” Kind of silly, but it works for me and that’s what’s important. It needs to work for you.

Part of psyching yourself into a confident state of mind is also in how you view and deal with your audience. When speaking with a group of people, there’s a common irrational fear many experience from their audience.

You might be convinced some people in the audience are silently judging everything about you or that they came to see you fail. Granted, that may or may not be false and regardless, their thoughts shouldn’t be your concern. But there’s a bigger point to understand here. Absolutely everyone in that audience – no matter where you are speaking and who you are speaking to – has one thing in common.

They don’t want to be bored.

Tell me, honestly, do you watch someone get up on a podium in front of lots of people and think to yourself, “Yes! This is going to be so bad, I just can’t wait to be bored!”

Do you search Rate My Professors for the most dull and mundane professors to pick for your classes?

No, you want to be entertained. You’re hoping that a person speaking to you and many others for whatever length of time is going to be insightful and engaging. You want them to succeed.

In other words, the audience wants you to succeed.

When the shoe is on the other foot, when you’re in the audience and you see someone messing up or stuttering on a word, what do you do? You pretend nothing is wrong. You hope they recover and move on. The audience gives positive reinforcement inside their heads, not harsh criticism.

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