independent music on the internet internet music sales on the internet independent musicians opinions on the internet mainstream musicians opinions on the internet independent music journalism on the internet
independent music on the internet?
It is no wonder that the most mainstream of today's recording artists would balk when their collective works began to show up on Napster and similar music-sharing Web sites. Why should Kid Rock or Dr. Dre even have to bother thinking about turning a profit from a "new medium" -- the Internet -- when their corporate record labels are already assuring such stars financial security and continued success by commandeering those media outlets with proven track records -- TV and radio.

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internet music sales
For many independent music fans, the biggest complaint has always been that there is no good place to buy indie music. One can find a store that carries independent music in most major cities or college towns, but most towns do not have such a store. For this reason, the correlation between the success of independent music stores on the Internet and indie music's file-sharing explosion is not very surprising.

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independent musicians
For the modern independent musician looking to gain some attention, there are two viable options. First, the independent artist could advertise locally, play some shows, and then home for some positive local press, followed by growing regional notoriety and so on. The alternative is to publicize on the Internet and hope to build name recognition, which will enhance the possibility of a successful tour (which could lead to positive press on a large-scale level).

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mainstream musicians
Instead of fretting the Internet, established mainstream musicians should treat the medium as movie studios do their films. Creating a nifty Web site in support of your killer new album is not going to hurt record your Billboard debut. Whether the generic major label argument would be that "fans will simply download an entire album instead of buy" is valid or not, is up for debate. However, given a quality product, music fans will tend to make the purchase, especially after previewing the release. Perhaps sales of Kid Rock's latest LP fell because of a poor quality product rather than rampant file-sharing?

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indie music journalism
Magazines for independent music fans such as Magnet and Puncture have each existed for over a decade, hiding on the racks of bookstores in relative obscurity, usually stocked behind some issues of TigerBeat or Bop, if at all. Those magazines are full of insightful tips that suggest the next few records an indie music hipster might want to go ahead and mail-order. The only problem is, if a hot-sounding artist featured in one of the magazine's articles is not on the accompanying sampler CD, "buying blind" can be a frightening experience.

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