What is Oceanography?
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Your Mother Ocean

The ocean is considered the last frontier of our planet. Walking on the moon is supposedly easier than studying the ocean floor. However, modern technology has enabled a global collaboration of research possible. With the Internet, engineers, researchers, resource managers, planners, mariners, students, and even surfers can utilize data insurmountably.

courtesy of NASA
Photographed by the Challenger crew (1984), shows the increased sediment erosion due to the Answan Damn built in 1964. courtesy of NASA
The Challenger crew photographed these sporadic collections of eddies off Libya. Then, just seconds later, a set of four spirals in a line seemed to confirm that the counterclockwise eddies were spinning off a strong current shear in the ocean. The orbits were not repetitive enough to determine the life histories of the eddies, but their occurrence in the confined Mediterranean Sea was good evidence that shears along currents, or coastal boundaries, generated the spirals.
Links to: NOAA
Scripps Institute Woods Hole GLOBE
NASA
Created by Robin L. Wood
Last updated: 13 April 1999
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