Overview
Symptoms/Diagnosis
Prevention/Screening
Research
Treatments
Sources

 

Ovarian Cancer is the #1 cause of death from gynecological cancers in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, ovarian cancer accounts for 4 percent of all cancers among women. More than 25,000 women are diagnosed with this disease each year, and over 16,090 will die from it in 2004, according to American Cancer Society statistics.

The real danger is, unfortunately, 70 percent of women who develop ovarian cancer are diagnosed at an advanced stage in the disease, when the 5-year survival rate is only 15 to 20 percent. This type of cancer strikes most often with only subtle symptoms and continues to grow unnoticed. It is referred to as the "Silent Killer," and for this reason, it is extremly important for women of all ages to know how to protect themselves from this disease. Learning how to prevent ovarian cancer or to catch it in its early, most curable stages is the key to saving lives.

This site is dedicated to disseminating knowledge about ovarian cancer - what it is, the symptoms and diagnosis, prevention and screening, research, treatments and, of course, sources.


What is Ovarian Cancer?


Ovarian cancer is a type of cancer that arises in the ovaries, the female reproductive organs that are located on each side of the uterus, which is located in the pelvis. The functions of the ovaries include storing eggs and secreting hormones, which regulate pregnancy and menstruation. When the cells in the ovary become abnormal and divide uncontrollably, ovarian cancer results. These cancer cells can now invade and destroy surrounding tissue and metastasize, or spread to other areas of the body.

 

Here is a video introduction to Ovarian Cancer (Source: CancerSource.com):

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Find out your Cancer Risk (from the Harvard Center for Cancer Prevention).

 

Note: Female anatomy/ovarian tumor graphic courtesy of The Mayo Clinic




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© 2004 Laura McCommons.