Long road to equality

From slavery to the Civil War, from Reconstruction to Civil Rights, blacks have waged a battle for equality in all aspects of their lives.

The fight for freedom from slavery eventually led to the fight for equal rights and to have the same opportunities awarded them as citizens of the United States. Yet, for a time, blacks were not considered citizens.

Blacks around the nation and in communities from coast to coast fought, protested and yearned for their civil rights and finally, more than a century after the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed slaves, blacks were finally considered citizens.

Now, blacks finally got the chance for education. Not just any education, but higher education now was more of a possible reality than a dream.


James Meredith

James Meredith at the University of Mississippi in Oxford, Miss.,
in 1962.

Photo by Marion S. Trikosko. Copyprint. New York World-Telegram and
Sun Photograph Collection, Prints and Photographs Division in the Library
of Congress
. Reproduction Number: LC-U9-8556-24 (9-8)

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Copyright 2003 Nyree Doucette