A Tribute to the Most Celebrated Classical Composers


  Brass Instruments

THE
SYMPHONIC
  ORCHESTRA 

   Introduction  

   Epochs of
Classical Music


   Brass
Instruments


    Percussion Instruments
   
    String Instruments      

   Woodwind
Instruments




    The brass section of the orchestra is known for its brilliant and blazing sounds. Brass instruments are usually made of metal tubes with a cylindrically shaped mouthpieces. The notes that come out of the bell shaped end are produced when the air column within vibrates. The tighter the player compresses, his lips the higher the note. Playing the brass instruments softly produces a mellow sound and a mute over the bell gives the composer the ability to convey mystery or menace. In order to tune the brass, the length of the tube must be shortened or lengthened accordingly.

   The oldest brass instruments are the horn and the trumpet which were initially constructed out of animal horns. Before joining the orchestra, most brass instruments were used for military or ceremonial purposes. In 1815, when valves were invented, the brass instruments were adjusted to produce different tones by diverting the airflow through the tubing.

    The French horn was the first brass instrument to be used consistently by composers in orchestras in the early 1700s. The reason may be that its tones blend easily with the stings and the woodwinds. The trumpet, on the other hand, can supersede the entire orchestra if needed. It is the highest pitched of the brass instruments. Normally two or three are used in a symphonic orchestra for that reason. The tone of the tuba is much deeper than the trumpet due to the large size of the instrument and its tubing system.

   
     
   


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