Foreign Correpondents Reporting From Afar

From Carrier Pigeons
to Wireless Networks:
Getting the Dispatch Home



THE DIRECTORY

HOME

PIGEONS AND CABLES

EARLY CORRESPONDENTS

BEFORE MODERN TELECOM

FROM TELEX TO LAPTOPS AND CELLULAR

TODAY'S FOREIGN REPORT

SOURCES AND RESOURCES

ABOUT YOUR INTREPID WEBMASTER


So what's it like in a third world county bereft of modern telecommunication facilities when you've just finished you're dispatch and now it's time to get it home half-way around the world?


An "incriminating" manual typewriter.

As Paris-based correspondent Frank Viviano of the San Francisco Chronicle bemusedly recalled, not too long ago a foreign corresopndent's gear consisted primarily of "an incriminating manual typewriter and a prayer."

Today, though, it's a brave new world.

Thanks to the wonders of silicone and satellites, two indispensable tools have become the standard operating equipment for corresponents: the laptop and ceullular phone.

Now correspondents have the ubiquitous utility of the Interent at their beck and call. Stories are commonly e-mailed to newsrooms in the United States. More importantly, reporters in even remote locales are able to gather reams of information by means of the Web, from wire services to databases -- provided a reasonably reliable connection can be made.

So here is a brief history of the past and present of the tools of foreign reporting.


COPYRIGHT 1999-2000 Eric Burroughs ----- Contact the Webmaster at tmcgee@ufl.edu


Last Updated: December 7, 1999