Web Advertising


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Web Advertising
Why Internet?
How to Measure

Considering the fact that there exist millions of sites on the Web, it is crucial to identify the types of Web sites in order to determine what products and services are best served by advertising on a certain Web site (Frazer and McMillan, 1999). In addition, Williamson (1995) emphasized the importance of an advertising plan to determine if a particular product or service is suited to Web marketing. For this reason, the classification of Web sites could be another important aspect to measure the advertising effectiveness on the Web.

Although there are several standards to classify numerous Web sites, previous categorization systems are mostly based on the contents of each Web site. For instance, a number of search engines and Internet yellow pages adopted this approach to provide convenient way s to find a Web site. Yahoo, one of the most popular portal sites, presents approximately 20 product and service categories as of February, 2000 (URL: http:// www.yahoo.com).

In terms of marketing points of view, Hoffman et al. (1995) proposed a typology of commercial Web sites by providing six functional categories of commercial Web pages: online storefront, Internet presence, content, mall, incentive site, and search agents. While their classification was useful to understand the role of each category, it seems that their categorization more leans toward the commercial Web sites.

In contrast to the content-based classification, the study of Lin (1999) provided the consumer motive-based classifications. She categorized 20 on-line service features into the three motivations (Information, Infortainment, and Shopping) via factor analysis with principal component analysis. Considering the traditional meaning of "receiver" and "sender" in communication process, it seems that her classification more focuses on the receivers' point of view along with their motivation for using the Internet while most past categorization systems were based on the content of Web sites from the providers' point of view.



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Last updated: November 29, 2000 | WebMaster and Author: Wonpyo Kang
; copyright 2000 Wonpyo Kang | wpkang@ufl.edu