Main Course

The main course is the heart and most complex part of any meal. The recipes that I have included are some of my favorites. The dirty rice is a meal I learned from my best friend. I've eaten smothered chicken my entire life and Hoppin' John has been apart of my family for generations.

Smothered Chicken

Smothered Chicken is a southern classic. A dish is smothered when it is cooked in or marinated in gravy. This is southern delight will sure leave you wanting more. This dish is also great with rice and mashed potatoes.This is a family recipe!s

Ingredients

Directions

  1. First, Place your chicken in a suitable-sized pot and fill it with water about half an inch above the chicken (you want to add enough so that once the chicken is done you’ll have enough left over to make the gravy). Turn the stove on high and let the water begin to boil for 30-45 minutes. Between this time, if the water boils all out, you may add more (you want to limit the amount of times you do this because you want to keep the juices from the chicken for added flavor). You will know when the chicken is done when it begins to slightly fall off the bone.
  2. While the chicken is boiling, chop up the ½ onion (the way you want to chop them is up to you).
  3. To make the gravy, add the ¼ cup of all-purpose flour to a small bowl. Add about 1-2 dashes of the gravy sauce to the flour, and also add water, about half the amount that you used for the flour. Mix them all together until the lumps disappear.
  4. Once the Chicken is done, turn the stove’s setting to lo (or medium lo) add in the gravy mix. When you add in the gravy mix, use a whisk or fork to stir it in so that lumps will not form. Add in the Chicken Bouillon Cubes if you would like, and/or add in the seasonings. Let it simmer for about 10-15 minutes, stirring it occasionally.

And Voila! Enjoy!

To really bring out the flavor of this dish, substitute the water for chicken broth. The extra taste is explosive and will add so much flavor to the rice.

Dirty Rice

A delicious mix of rice, vegtables and meat. You will definately enjoy!This a family recipe and I absolutely love it!

Ingredients

Directions

  1. First, chop up the stalks of celery and the ½ of the bell pepper and combine them in a small bowl. Also, slice the sausages 1/8 of an inch thick and cut the sausage rounds into fours.
  2. While chopping the other ingredients, begin to cook the ground beef. First, season the ground beef. Place beef in a skillet on medium heat and cook it thoroughly. Do not cook the beef in 1 bunch, break it up into the smallest pieces possible. Once done, drain the left over oil and fat and place the cooked beef in a plate cover with 2 napkins so that it will absorb the grease from the beef
  3. In a skillet, cook the sausages thoroughly on medium heat. Then drain the cooked sausages on a plate covered with a napkin.
  4. Pour the 4 cups of water into a medium saucepan and turn the stove on high. Pour the 2 cups of rice, vegetable mixture, beef and sausage into the saucepan and let it boil for about 1 minute. Add in about 2 dashes of the gravy browning sauce. Then turn the heat down to Lo, cover the pot with a lid and let it cook between 20-25 minutes.**I was always taught to never take the lid off a pot when cooking rice**
  5. Once the rice is done cooking, use a utensil to mix all the vegetables and meat with rice.

And Voila! Enjoy!

Hoppin' John

Hoppin' John is traditional eaten on New Year's Day with collard greens. A southern saying says "eat poor that day, eat rich the rest of the year. Rice for riches and peas for peace". The collard greens are said to add extra prosperity to the year.

Hoppin' John

This is a traditional Southern feast on New Year’s Day. It’s a wonderful blend of rice, black-eyed peas, and ham that will make you happy all year. There are several legends behind the name Hoppin' John. One is that people in South Carolina would invite a guest in by saying "Hop in John". And the list goes on. This recipe is originally from this site

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Rinse peas and pick them over. Cover with cold water; add 1 tablespoon salt and let stand overnight
  2. Drain peas, discarding water, and place in a 6 to 8-quart stockpot. In a 10-inch cast iron skillet, saute salt pork or bacon until crisp; add it to the peas, reserving the drippings.
  3. Add onion, a little salt and 2 cups water. Bring just to a boil, lower heat, and simmer until peas are tender, about 20 minutes. A small amount of the cooking liquid should remain; if liquid is absorbed too quickly, add fresh water by1/4 cups.
  4. When peas are tender, add cooked rice to pot. Stir in 2 tablespoons of the reserved bacon drippings, salt, pepper and hot sauce to taste. Cover and simmer about 15 minutes longer so flavors combine and rice absorbed some of the remaining cooking liquid.
  5. To serve, garnish with green onions.

And Voila! Enjoy!