How to Play a Basic Rock Beat on Drums -- powered by ExpertVillage.com
Drum Fill

The most important thing about learning any instrument is practice! I値l bet you池e dying to explore all of the drums set before you. The coolest thing about drum sets are the variations you can find. Sets can be made up of five pieces, all the way to 30 or more. When you run out of drums or toms to add, percussion instruments can easily be tacked on such as a cowbell or tambourine.

It is typically easier if you begin with a basic beat involving the high-hat, snare and bass drum. Once you conquer these three simultaneously, you値l be able to have more fun. Coordination is key.

The diagram to the left demonstrates basic types of notes that every drummer should know and understand thoroughly. You値l see that two 8th notes fit into one quarter note. Four 16th notes fit into one quarter note and so on. These notes will be used in all drum music or tabs.

In the video, also demonstrated on the left, you will learn a basic rock beat. While starting out, it is wise to take Christopher痴 advice by starting with your high-hat, adding in the bass drum and finally the snare. As you get more coordinated, you値l be able to speed up the tempo and add more licks on both the snare and bass drum.

Once you have this skill mastered, you値l be able to add fills. Drum fills are those little sections that break the normal rhythm to add emphasis or a new dynamic to the music, typically seen before the chorus or verses. The bottom photo seen to the left provides a basic drum fill. The first measure is a basic drum beat similar to the one demonstrated in the video followed by four beats of 16th notes, twice the speed of the high-hat. It is then repeated.

Having a hard time understanding which line of music goes to which drum? The 度 found on the top line always belongs to the high-hat. The line below it with the note connected to the high-hat will be your snare drum. The quarter note represented on the bottom space will always be your bass drum.

Getting yourself into a practice routine is a great idea. Warm-ups will become crucial the more you play, you really want to build the muscles that control stick movements. One thing to do everytime is what is commonly referred to as "8 on a hand." In this example you will do exactely as it says: play eight notes on the right then switch to the left and play eight more. Repeat. Try to do this exercise at several stick heights. Drumlines typically do it at 12 inches (bending your wrists all the way), 9 inches, 6 inches, and when you want to play soft, 3 inches. Try to concentrate on keeping the tips of your sticks together.

Once you have mastered "8 on a hand," try alternating your hands after each "8 on a hand" exercise. For example, your sticking would look like this:

R R R R R R R R

R L R L R L R L

L L L L L L L L

R L R L R L R L