Improvements

Image

Image

Critics

Critics

Ethics

Ethics

Home

Home

 

The leaders of the public relations industry have been trying for years to change the negative stereotype of the industry. There have been several tactics used to improve the quality of the profession.

One of the most important tactics is professional organizations. PRSA has been at the forefront of the campaign to help the image of public relations become more respectable. The society is focused on helping practitioners in their professional development. Through newsletters, seminars, conferences, websites, newspapers and magazines, PRSA provides the latest information about the industry to its members.

Professional development is the mission of the PRSA National Conference, which is held once a year in various cities throughout the United States. Members spend one week learning about the industry. The theme for the 2002 national conference is "Public Relations: Interpreting a World of Change and Challenge."

Each session that PRSA offers gives conference-goers advice and training about how to handle problems in public relations. This is one way that PRSA works to establish the credibility of the profession as an industry.

Another way that practitioners have tried to change the image of the industry is by building relationships with the media. Forming working relationships with journalists allows the free flow of information. According to Bill Ryan, founder and partner of Niehaus Ryan Wong, "taking time to understand what the journalist writes about, then offering yourself as a resource- not trying to make a sales call" is the best way to form a relationship with the media.

Reporters dislike public relations people because they do not think they are honest. By forming a trusting relationship with reporters, the practitioners are better able to communicate their client's message.

Formal education is also a tactic that can be used to improve the industry. In the past, most public relations practitioners had no formal education. The industry did not require a degree in communications to practice. Most of what they knew was based on experience. Education provides an understanding of the industry to its practitioners and helps establish credibility with the public.

And, of course, even though every one of these tactics have helped the profession, the only way the image of the profession can truly change is if practitioners pledge to practice ethically. In a profession that does not have standards, practicing good ethics is important.

In conclusion, the reason for most of the misrepresentation of public relations is due to a lack of communication. In a field that is based on communication, this is unacceptable. Practitioners must agree to do some public relations work for their industry.

Pires refers to this as "paying back" the industry. She suggests that in order for the industry to thrive in the next few years, its practitioners must participate in the image building of the profession. Public relations practitioners must realize that for the profession to succeed and be recognized, they must step up to the challenge.

Recent graduates have a crucial role is this image building. As the future leaders of the profession, they must commit to changing the negative stereotypes of the industry. It is their responsibility to hold the profession to the high quality of expertise that they are taught in school.

Through the efforts of every practitioner, the industry has the potential to become a profession.

 


PRSA has been at the forefront of the campaign to help the image of public relations become more respectable.

 

 

 

 

 

 


By forming a trusting relationship with reporters, practitioners are better able to communicate their client's message.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The reason for most of the misrepresentation of public relations is due to a lack of communication.

 

 

 

 

 

 


In order for the industry to thrive in the next few years, its practitioners must participate in the image building of the profession.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
   

Site created by
Ashley Oswald
ashly2716@msn.com

See my sources!

  ImageCritics EthicsHome