One more for the fans

By Brett Roegiers
Gainesville.com

Iíd speculate that the majority of the people that filled Common Grounds on Saturday night were there to see Whoreculture and remember the good olí days. After all, this may be their last chance, at least for a while.

Whoreculture has been around for more than 15 years but has not been very active lately. They still manage to play about one show a year and they drew quite a crowd on Saturday.

Vocalist Rich Haggard thanked Common Grounds for having an over-30 night, referring to the noticeably older audience.

A drink in one hand, a smoke in the other, Haggard refused to let aging stand in the way of rock and roll. The bandís best days may be behind them, but that doesnít seem to stop them from putting on a show every so often for their dedicated fans.

Both Haggard and drummer Rusty Valentine are also in SuperJudge.

Seeing as how I was not familiar with Whoreculture, I was more excited to see the opening band, Escape Grace.

I had been meaning to catch this bandís live show for a while, but this was the first time I made it out, and I hope it will not be the last.

Escape Graceís sound is a blend of hardcore and straight-up rock, with heavy, intricate guitar riffs and blistering screams.

While it may be near impossible to understand what vocalist Cole Harper is screaming about without reading the lyrics, it is easy to see and hear the emotion in his delivery.

The band released a five-song EP on Providence, R.I.ís City of Hell Records. The black and silver floral-based design work from Suicide Noteís Casey Donley adds to the aesthetic of the band and makes for some impressive album artwork. Since then, Derron Nuhfer, previously of Less than Jake and Gunmoll, has taken over on bass guitar.

I believe Escape Grace has another release in the works, and hopefully they will have some more shows lined up soon. If you consider yourself a fan of powerful, intense music, I suggest you check them out.